Challenging behaviour

Challenging behaviour

 

 

Narcissism, as a distinct condition, is very common and is probably the source of most of the challenging behaviour we might experience in life from others.  

Psychopathy is still poorly understood, but is not synonymous with sociopathy or anti-social behaviour.  

There are all kinds of reasons why someone might display challenging behaviour.  Somebody might be overly concerned with their own needs because their own needs are great and pressing; they may be damaged, wounded, seeking to replay a story so that it finally turns out right.  They might just be a spoilt brat, be inexperienced, or have poor social skills.  They may have had a stunted development.  They may have been taught to be narcissistic, without actually being a genetic narcissist.  They may be insecure and so they feel a need to lash out, as an ego defense.  Often, fear or trauma can lead to long term anger, a state of high arousal and vigilance, and a high sensitivity to perceived threat.  

 

 

Narcissists

Psychopaths

Abuse and control  

 

 

A challenging person is still a person  

Narcissists, psychopaths or others who may present challenges should not be vilified on the strength of this “diagnosis”.  Even if someone causes harm to those around them, they are still a flesh-and-blood human being like the rest of us, and as such, deserve to be given human rights.  It is best to be kind to them as much as possible.  See also: how to get the best out of a narcissist

 

 

Challenging behaviour in children

Professor Essi Viding gives a lecture at University College London, Psychology and Language Sciences, 2014.  

Despite the title of the video, this is an exploration of the research into “callous-unemotional traits” (whether low or high) in children showing challenging behaviour.

Are you worried about a child?  

 

Links

[mis] guided light:

Professor Joe Newman of the University of Wisconsin works to improve the behaviour of psychopaths in a reward-based programme at the Mendota Treatment Center.   

‘We’re scared of our adopted son’  

When your child is a psychopath